Tintagel - the breathtaking home of the legendary King Arthur

Tintagel - the breathtaking home of the legendary King Arthur

Tintagel Castle is a now-ruined medieval-era creation located on the small peninsula of Tintagel Island, in north Cornwall. Its location is famed as the legendary birthplace of King Arthur, and the 13th-century castle that stood here was built several centuries after his supposed reign, in honour of the mythic British hero king.

Ramsgate's impressive Royal Victoria Pavilion

Ramsgate's impressive Royal Victoria Pavilion

A striking example of seaside architecture, the Royal Victoria Pavilion in Ramsgate is a grade II listed building, built as a concert hall/assembly rooms and designed by architect Stanley Davenport Adshead, in the style of a Robert Adam orangery.

'George Eliot' - Victorian novelist Mary Ann Evans

'George Eliot' - Victorian novelist Mary Ann Evans

Mary Ann Evans, writing under the pseudonym of George Eliot, was a highly acclaimed Victorian novelist, famed for writing 'Middlemarch' and 'The Mill on the Floss'. But it wasn’t just her written works and her assumed identity that brought her fame; she also courted controversy in her personal life.

The London plane - a natural survivor in the city

The London plane - a natural survivor in the city

Providing trees in a built up city landscape is a noble mission - but sometimes a challenge. In many British cities, the species of choice has been the London plane - an impressive deciduous tree with hand-shaped leaves, and bark that flakes off.

Tooting Bec Lido - one of London's cool pools

Tooting Bec Lido - one of London's cool pools

Tooting Bec Lido in South London is the largest open-air fresh water swimming pool in the UK at 100m by 33m, and one of the recently revived lidos in London, now extremely popular as escapes on a hot day, and for dedicated open-air swimmers.

The Ague - when Malaria brought fear to England

The Ague - when Malaria brought fear to England

Malaria is now regarded as a tropical disease, but it was once endemic in England when known as 'the ague'. Its occurences brought fear and panic, as can be seen in this satirical print from 1788. It was not known at the time that mosquitoes were the vector of the disease.

Six things to delight and entertain you every day.